037 Justin Lacroix – Production Sound Mixer based out of southern Maine and has worked on the reality TV show Survivor

Justin Lacroix is a production sound mixer based out of southern Maine. He’s worked on the reality TV show Survivor and on projects for MTV, Nat Geo, HBO and Vice. He uses a Sound Devices 633 mixer/recorder, Lectrosonics SRc wireless receivers, Lectrosonics SMWBs and SMDWBs wireless transmitters, Sanken COS-11 lav mics, Sennheiser 416 shotgun mics and Sennheiser MKH-50 for interiors. Justin also uses Tentacle Sync time code boxes.

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036 Rick Garza – Production Sound Mixer based out of Ventura, California and works on Discovery Channel’s Naked and Afraid

Rick Garza is a production sound mixer based out of Ventura, California. He’s worked on Discovery Channel’s Naked and Afraid and Mariah’s World with Mariah Carey. Rick uses a Sound Devices 633, Lectrosonics wireless transmitters and receivers, Sennheiser 416 shotgun mics, Ktek boom pole, PSC power distro and Tentacle Sync for timecode.

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035 Jay Menez – Production Sound Mixer, Director and Producer based out of Los Angeles, California

Jay Menez is a production sound mixer, director, producer and author based out of Los Angeles, California. He uses a Sound Devices 688, Lectrosonics SRc receivers and SMWB wireless transmitters, SL-6 for power distro, Sennheiser MKH-416 shotgun mic and the MKH-50, Sanken COS-11 lavs, and Betso timecode boxes. Jay’s book is called Spark-The 8 Mental Habits of Highly Successful People.

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Episode 34 – James Nolan – Production Sound Mixer based out of Los Angeles, California

James Nolan is a production sound mixer based out of Los Angeles, California. He’s worked on documentaries, reality TV and commercial productions. James is originally from Dublin, Ireland. He uses a Sound Devices 788 with a CL-8, Lectrosonics and Wisycom wireless, dpa 4017 shotgun mic, Sennheiser mkh 8050, and dpa lav mics. Sennheiser IEM as Comteks.

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Episode 033 – Steve Saada – Boom Op & Production Sound Mixer based out of the Baltimore/DC area

Steve Saada is a boom op and production sound mixer based out of the Baltimore / Washington DC area. He’s worked on the Netflix series, House of Cards and on the HBO series, Veep, with Julia Louis-Dreyfus. Steve uses a Sound Devices 633 mixer/recorder, Lectrosonics wireless, Audio Root power distribution, Sanken COS-11 lavs, Sennheiser MKH-50 shotgun mics, Betso timecode boxes and Sennheiser G3 wireless camera hops.

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Episode 014 – Kally Williams – Location Sound Mixer based out of Los Angeles, California

Kally Williams is a location sound mixer based out of Los Angeles, California. She uses a Sound Devices 633 mixer/recorder, Lectrosonics SRc wireless receivers, Sanken COS 11 mics, Tentacle Sync for timecode, a Schoeps CMIT 5u mic, a DPA 4017 mic, and Audio Root for power distribution. Kally also has a Sound Devices MixPre-6 for smaller projects.

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What Microphone Sounds Best With Your Voice

Have you ever wondered what microphone sounds best with your voice? At Podcast Movement 2017 in Anaheim, California, I was invited to work at the Podcast Engineering School booth where we set up 10 different microphones, all in a row, so people could sit down and try each one.

Mic Test

We recorded the mic test and then emailed the mp3 file to each person so they could listen to the recording later in a quieter environment. I did the test multiple times myself and was pleasantly surprised how some of the lower priced mics sounded. You don’t have to spend a lot of money to get a decent microphone, especially if you’re just getting started and may not have the budget for a really high-end mic. Here’s a list of all the mics we tried:

Behringer XM1800s $39 (3-Pack)  Yes, there are 3 mics in a handy carrying case.
AKG c1000s $199  Condenser microphone which requires Phantom power or two AA batteries.
Audio-Technica ATR 2100 $64.59  This mic is popular with podcasters and is both USB and XLR compatible.
Sennheiser E835 $99.95
Audio-Technica BP40 $349
Blue Yeti Pro $249  This mic is also USB and XLR compatible.
Blue Spark $199
Electro-Voice RE320 $299
Electro-Voice RE20 $449  Has traditionally been used as a radio DJ mic.
Shure SM7B $399  This vocal mic was preferred by Michael Jackson and he used it on the Thriller album.
Heil PR40 $308  Another popular mic in the podcasting community.

RE320 and RE20

I personally had never tried the Audio-Technica ATR 2100 and was always curious. It’s a decent entry level mic and people like that it is USB. Even the Behringer XM1800s mics weren’t bad and you get a 3-pack and a carrying case! So which mic is the best? Well, like choosing a wine, you just have to decide for yourself, which one you like. Every voice is unique and what works for one person doesn’t always work for someone else. None of these mics were terrible but there were differences. I listened to over a hundred people try these mics and one size does not fit all. Before you purchase a microphone, try it first and make sure you like how it sounds. If you can, try multiple mics so you have a comparison.  Most music equipment stores have a mic booth where you can try before you buy. Happy recording!Share This:
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